The Roman Fasces of Cincinnati | Statue of Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus, the legendary Roman who defeated the Aequians and rescued the trapped Roan Army. With one hand he returns the fasces, symbol of power and fraternity to the Dictator of Rome. In the other, a plow, which represents his life as citizen and farmer. Cincinnati was named in 1790, after Cincinnatus by Governor Arthur St. Clair, member of the Society of Cincinnati, an order of Revolutionary War Officers whose first President was George Washington (U.S. 1ˢᵗ POTUS), who himself in his day was likened to Cincinnatus.

MEN AMONG THE RUINS, GHOSTS OF OLD NATIONS, UNWRITTEN HISTORY AND MISSING PUZZLES

The fasces is not a symbol we just adopted. It was already apart of us. The older generations had a different sense of what Duty pertained to and respected Authority differently from our Post-Countercultures of the 1960s. Some will not smile too kindly to the idea of the fasces as a symbol of the Republic. It is no different from the Masonic aspects and history in this country, which others would not like to include as part of the story. We care little for what the symbol has come to psychologically mean in the past century versus many centuries of what it meant before the Fascists of Italy, with whom ideal the fasces fits as well. It is a symbol of REPUBLICANISM, of which there are many others. We find the symbol even used depicting the union between disciples of the Eleusinian Mysteries holding it at the altar. What are mere symbols, in fact tell a long history and embody ideas — ideas, which are the foundations of early hopes for America, its governing and cultural philosophy, its political structure, its inspirations and its destiny. In order to get rid of it, and some horrified by unwelcomed truths or ignorant of its true meanings, one would have to believe they had to turn against their own country, to reshape and remould it howsoever they choose. Sadly, some already believe this. Today’s America have little ideas to work on, but the mottos and rhetoric of the modern Politician. Of the Utopian and the Socialist, because the American has lost vision, and starves for a visionary. No real faith. No true spirit. No true Union. The American is suffering. The American is being crushed and soul-polluted by the very social structure they inhabit. There are limits to viewing the country through merely the lens of its oppressed and powerless, as well as through the lens of the powerful, because of how each choose to approach the History of a People. Perhaps, that has grown stale, because to such thinker, the founders, traditions and the ideas are merely that of the Oppressor, of the “Old White Men.” He smiles with glee at the decline of the latter’s progeny; and look with what this thinker is left with, and what they offer our Age. Very little seed. Very little root. There are some roots, which cannot be uprooted. There are some notions and principles, which convey the very function and soul of the nation beckoning to only the true and worthiest of visionaries. Who will be possessed of it? Will you be this visionary?

American, Who are you? Where are you going?

James Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur – What Is An American: “What then is the American, this ‘New Man’”?

“What then is the American, this new man? . . . He is an American, who, leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds.” J. HECTOR ST. JOHN DE CRÈVEŒUR, LETTERS Continue reading James Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur – What Is An American: “What then is the American, this ‘New Man’”?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.