P.M.C.V., Minervans and Theosophy

MinervaNS ARE Lovers of THE ARTS, ANCIENT WISDOM & Education

MINERVA. The God’s Intelligence (Divine Reason), the Nous, the deliverer, liberator, and savior serves a befitting representation to use. Minerva is commonly used in the early American republican symbolism, inspired by early Graeco-Roman neoclassical art.

P.M.C.V. is an acronym for the Latin motto, Per Me Caeci Vident, meaning “through me the blind become sighted.” P.M.C.V. was one of the acronyms on the seal of Johann Adam Weishaupt’s Bavarian Order of the Illuminati in the eighteenth-century, written on an open book, and held by an owl, signifying learning. It is surrounded by a laurel wreath, symbolizing graduation. This may be understood through the function of ancient initiatic systems.

The use of the acronym does not apply to the author, but describes the philosophy and objectives underlying the MYSTERIES.

“The pain of our corruption must be healed by virtue, knowledge, and eloquence.”

GIAMBATTISTA VICO (1668-1744)
MINVRA_Li Ji Quote

NeoPlatonists, DIOGENES and THE Greek Origin OF THE TERM THEOSOPHY

THEOSOPHY means Divine Wisdom, implying in it a belief, not in a personal god, but ONE immutable, eternal, omnipresent, boundless ABSOLUTE DEITY, as was held by the theosophists of the Neo-Platonic Alexandrian School. It refers to belief in the daimonia (“gods” and “demons”). It is therefore, not “the Wisdom of God” that is meant as in common theology, but divine occult wisdom as is held by (or of) [and is intelligible to] ‘the gods.’ See Jean-Louis Siemons: “Theosophy” in Neo-Platonic and Christian Literature. Regarding MYTHOGRAPHY and under-meanings (hyponoia), the Neo-Platonists were Analogeticists — “on account of their method of interpreting all sacred legends, symbolical myths and mysteries, by a rule of analogy or correspondence, so that events which had occurred in the external world were regarded as expressing operations and experiences of the human soul” (Helena Blavatsky, What Is Theosophy). The origins of the Ancestral Gnosis through the Neo-Platonists were traced to times antedating the Ptolemaic dynasties according to Diogenes Laertius (Diogenes Laërtius), and were passed down and meant for those their contemporaries styled “theodidaktoi” (god-taught). The MINERVAN is he or she who has learned the method by which one becomes attached to their inner god; all while also embodying those characteristics identified with Minerva.

RELATED TITLE EXPLAINING MINERVA AND ITS USE IN AMERICAN SYMBOLISM AND ARCHITECTURE

The Roman MINERVA or Greek Athena is a Deity of DIVINE WISDOM (Jove’s INTELLIGENCE), and it is the idea chosen to represent MINVRA. It is synonymous with the Greek meaning of THEOSOPHIA. The Roman MINERVA was represented in art and myth as a warrior with: — Valor, Wisdom-Intelligence, and Grace. In myth and art, we find her tempering her opposing principle: the aggressive warlike deity — MARS (Ares). We want to inspire a class of “new academicians” in civil society and academia. It alludes to Plato’s Academy, and “the Garden,” — a category for the Schools of Classical Greek Philosophical studies. The “Academy” refers to initiatory colleges, and the love for education upon which those colleges were based in antiquity.

The Liberator-God in Ancient Religion: Salvation and Resurrection of the Initiated

Resurrection of the DEAD and the Liberation of MAN in the MYSTERIES.  Ipsa scientia potestas est “Knowledge itself is power.” (Francis Bacon, Meditationes Sacrae, 1597) The Drama of Graduation in the Mysteries Think only the Greeks and Romans celebrated “the MYSTERIES?” I must be INITIATED, ere I die!! —Aristophanes, Eirene (“Peace” Comedy). The INITIATED, are the “just.”—Aristophanes. “Open your ears, O ye Initiated, Continue reading The Liberator-God in Ancient Religion: Salvation and Resurrection of the Initiated

Etruscan Visual Representations of the Birth of Athena and Minerva: A Comparative Study | Dr. Shanna Kennedy-Quigley

Dr. Shanna Kennedy-Quigley’s paper from the Etruscan Studies Journal on the Etruscan visual representations of the Birth of Athena and Minerva provides historical, artistic, and cultural perspective of its common use in imagery. The paper explains the significant differences in the Etruscan cultural attitudes toward women, from those of their Greek contemporaries. It examines Etruscan Continue reading Etruscan Visual Representations of the Birth of Athena and Minerva: A Comparative Study | Dr. Shanna Kennedy-Quigley

Columbia (American Minerva) and the Fasces in “Reconstruction” for Equal Rights (1868), Harper’s Weekly | Artist Thomas Nast

“Reconstruction” by German-born American political cartoonist, Thomas Nast illustrates the Southern states being brought back into order with the North under the ancient symbol of collective power, authority and fraternity, the fasces and the nation’s motto, E Pluribus Unum (“Out of Many, One”). The symbolism of Columbia (America) depicted in Thomas Nast’s cartoon illustrations may Continue reading Columbia (American Minerva) and the Fasces in “Reconstruction” for Equal Rights (1868), Harper’s Weekly | Artist Thomas Nast

Minerva leads America in “The Apotheosis of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington”

MINERVA, Goddess of Wisdom leads America in “The Apotheosis of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington.” The Apotheosis of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington is a copperplate-printed toile fabric produced in several colorways in Britain between 1785-1800, after the first defeat of the British Empire. A banner reads “Where Liberty Dwells, There is My Country.” These Continue reading Minerva leads America in “The Apotheosis of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington”

The Lamp of Diogenes: “A Worthy Goal for the Welfare of Mankind”

“In this time, when the games and abuses of secret societies were without end, I wanted to make use of this human weakness for a real and worthy goal, the welfare of mankind (…) I wanted what the heads of the ecclesiastical and secular powers should do and want by virtue of their offices.” Johann Continue reading The Lamp of Diogenes: “A Worthy Goal for the Welfare of Mankind”

Jean-Louis Siemons: “Theosophy” in Neo-Platonic and Christian Literature

Dr. Jean-Louis Siémons article Theosofia in Neo-Platonic and Christian Literature (2nd to 6th Century A.D.), Theosophical History Centre, London, 1988, pp. 24-26. Dr. Siémons was an Associate of the United Lodge of Theosophists for over fifty years. This is to give us perspective on the 19th century Theosophical Movement’s place within the broader scope of theosophical Continue reading Jean-Louis Siemons: “Theosophy” in Neo-Platonic and Christian Literature