The Identity of Koot Hoomi of Kashmir, and College and Travels

This will briefly give independent information about Helena P. Blavatsky’s teacher K.H., apart from her own information. Since we have often quoted “The Mahatma Letters,” and K.H., it may be beneficial to know that we are not quoting some channelled, imagined disembodied spirit, who may or may have not existed. K.H. and Morya was said to have encouraged Continue reading The Identity of Koot Hoomi of Kashmir, and College and Travels

Mahatma Papers MS. about the Truth and Mission of Modern Theosophists

This 1881 letter about the ‘Truth’ of Divine Enlightenment and the Mission of Modern Theosophists was reported by K.H. to A.P. Sinnett, from their chief. This was his views on the role of Theosophists in aiding a new Wisdom revival, to promulgate their philosophical teachings, and make known, the once universal Wisdom-Religion, or Occult Philosophy hitherto Continue reading Mahatma Papers MS. about the Truth and Mission of Modern Theosophists

Before the Conversion: Helena Blavatsky on Shakyamuni Buddha and Buddhism

The nineteenth-century saw its first public Western converts to Buddhism. Helena P. Blavatsky and Henry S. Olcott, an American lawyer who worked on U.S. Pres. Lincoln’s assassination case, were the two leading movers of the Theosophical Movement. They both converted in 1880. This was being contrasted with Helena Blavatsky’s letter claiming to have studied among Continue reading Before the Conversion: Helena Blavatsky on Shakyamuni Buddha and Buddhism

How the Theosophical Movement Died: Adepts Break Ties, The Judge Case, and Olcott’s Decision

The idea of the “mahatmas,” and their secret brotherhood was abused by later leaders of the T.S. to establish new authorities. Ties were broken, due to a sense of betrayal, and the Society schisms. The men originally associated with H.P.B. broke their ties with the T.S.: “Yet, to those Theosophists, who are displeased with the Society Continue reading How the Theosophical Movement Died: Adepts Break Ties, The Judge Case, and Olcott’s Decision