Gordon S. Wood on Republicanism and Monarchy in the Eighteenth-Century

The value of our idea is presented much better by Gordon S. Wood. Republicanism, we learn, was not an underground ideology, merely confined to European culture. It was an important current, that blended and mingled with the monarchical mainstream. To be a liberal in the eighteenth-century, or to be enlightened, was to be a lover Continue reading Gordon S. Wood on Republicanism and Monarchy in the Eighteenth-Century

Rachel Weisz’s Hypatia in Agora: “I Believe in Philosophy”

“There have been times when “a considerable portion of enlightened minds” were taught in our schools. Such times there were in India, Persia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. But, as I remarked (…) the adept is the efflorescence of his age, and comparatively few ever appear in a single century. Earth is the battle-ground of moral no Continue reading Rachel Weisz’s Hypatia in Agora: “I Believe in Philosophy”

Everyone now sees fascists

An excerpt from Brendan O’Neill’s essay, Bolsonaro is not a fascist, on the danger of branding everyone a fascist; something rather than genuinely foreboding, becoming a sign of intellectual laziness. Mussolini’s Prediction of the future in the Last Days of his “Italian Social Republic” (1945) “The present war will produce an alteration in order of Continue reading Everyone now sees fascists

Classicists on the Alt-Right appropriating the Classics—Thoughts on the Classics and Modern Theosophy

THOUGHTS ON THE CLASSICS, ALT-RIGHT AND MODERN THEOSOPHY In the mid-point to the last quarter of 2018, many articles were written across platforms and the internet on how the Alt-Right and Conservatives were appropriating “the Greek and Latin Classics” to lend credibility to vicious and vindictive white supremacist and Identitarian ideology. I must state clearly, Continue reading Classicists on the Alt-Right appropriating the Classics—Thoughts on the Classics and Modern Theosophy

Columbia (American Minerva) and the Fasces in “Reconstruction” for Equal Rights (1868), Harper’s Weekly | Artist Thomas Nast

“Reconstruction” by German-born American political cartoonist, Thomas Nast illustrates the Southern states being brought back into order with the North into the ancient symbol of collective power and fraternity, the fasces, and the nation’s motto, E Pluribus Unum (“Out of Many, One”). The symbolism of Columbia (America) depicted in Thomas Nast’s cartoon illustrations are highly Continue reading Columbia (American Minerva) and the Fasces in “Reconstruction” for Equal Rights (1868), Harper’s Weekly | Artist Thomas Nast

The Solace of Gustav Mahler’s “Symphony of a Thousand” (No. 8: Part II & “Resurrection” Mov. 5: Part III and IV) | A Short Drama

The last of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2: Mov. 5 always brings the sounds of wedding bells, or a crowning of royalty, which brings solace. It is placed after Symphony No. 8 in E-flat major “Symphony of a Thousand”: Part II, Final Scene from Goethe’s “Faust”, Part II, Gustav Mahler (1860-1911). This is meant to be Continue reading The Solace of Gustav Mahler’s “Symphony of a Thousand” (No. 8: Part II & “Resurrection” Mov. 5: Part III and IV) | A Short Drama

Carl Orff: Ecce Gratum (“Behold, the Pleasant”)

“Behold, the Pleasant” “They gloryand rejoicein honeyed sweetnesswho striveto make use ofCupid’s prize;at Venus’ command…” ECCE GRATUM Ecce gratumet optatumver reducit gaudia,purpuratumfloret pratum,Sol serenat omnia.Iam am cedant tristia!Estas redit,nunc receditHyemis sevitia. Iam liquescitet decrescitgrando, nix et cetera,bruma fugit,et iam sugitVer estatis ubera;illi mens est misera,qui nec vivit,nec lascivitsub Estatis dextera. Glorianturte letanturin melle dulcedinis,qui conantur,ut Continue reading Carl Orff: Ecce Gratum (“Behold, the Pleasant”)

“They Shall Not Perish” (1918) Poster, American Propaganda | Artist Douglas Volk

1918 Poster (Publ. N.Y. : American Lithographic Co., 1918) titled “They Shall Not Perish,” by Artist Douglas Volk (1856-1935), depicts a girl who symbolized the Near East, clinging to woman (Columbia, Minerva, Marianne, Lady Liberty) with sword and U.S. flag, symbolizing America (Republicanism—against oppression). American Committee for Relief in the Near East campaign to raise money Continue reading “They Shall Not Perish” (1918) Poster, American Propaganda | Artist Douglas Volk

“Heaven has cast us off” – Tsu-li to King Zhou of Shang in the Shujing

Tsu-li announces to king Zhou-xin (the last emperor of Shang dynasty), that Heaven has abandoned him, because of his dissolute way. “Heaven is bringing an end to the Mandate of our dynasty. (…) It is not that the former kings do not aid us, but by your dissoluteness and sport you bring on the end Continue reading “Heaven has cast us off” – Tsu-li to King Zhou of Shang in the Shujing

The Septenary Principles of Man: Zurvanite (Zoroastrianism) and Theosophical Classification

R. C. Zaehner, Zurvan. A Zoroastrian Dilemma, Oxford, 1955, pp. 323, 334) demonstrates, that the Zurvanite Zoroastrian (a now extinct school of thought) classification (referring to levels of being or existence) is near identical to the Tāraka Rāja Yoga classification. However, as the Theosophical [esoteric] classification show, that the septenary division of man is explained in Continue reading The Septenary Principles of Man: Zurvanite (Zoroastrianism) and Theosophical Classification

The Four Modes of Birth in the Abhidharmakosa of Buddhism

In the ancient mythologies and literature of these traditions we find accounts of human creation, or modes of birth, found in both Buddhist and Zoroastrian texts. David Reigle details the Modes of Birth in the Abhidharmakosa, and its connection to the Stanzas (Dzyan) in The Secret Doctrine (1888). We find similar doctrines in the Zoroastrian Continue reading The Four Modes of Birth in the Abhidharmakosa of Buddhism